Amnte Nofre – Newsletter n. 7

the seventh issue of our newsletter,
Amnte Nofre – Pró season [prt] (22 December 2014 – 18 April 2015)

(click on the cover to open the link)

Also available on the web-site calameo.com:

http://ita.calameo.com/read/0013994446d245f71dca8

 

INDEX

Pró season: ‘Shef-bedet’, ‘Rekh-wr’, ‘Rekh-nedjes’, and Ermouthi

Researches and works completed

Iconographic researches

Suggestions

Appendix:
the “Sacred Drama” of the Myth of Horus from the Temple of Behdet

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“La Pronuncia dell’Antica Lingua Egizia” – III parte

Siamo lieti di presentarvi la terza parte del nostro studio dedicato alla ricostruzione della pronuncia e del sistema fonetico della Lingua Egizia. L’argomento di questa terza parte sono le semiconsonanti  3 , j , y ,  w , ˁ 

We are very glad to present you the third part of our study (in italian language, as soon as possible it will be translated in english and shared) dedicated to the reconstruction of the phonetic system and the pronunciation of the Ancient Egyptian language. The subject of this third part are the glides  3 , j , y ,  w , ˁ 

(cliccare sull’immagine per aprire il link/
click on the image to open the link)

Disponibile anche sul sito calameo.com:

http://ita.calameo.com/read/0013994447ca6bcfc5c28

INDICE

1- Le quattro semiconsonanti 3 , j , y , e w
1.a- Mutamenti nella scrittura risalenti al Medio Regno
1.b- Pronuncia e mutamenti fonetici:
j, y, 3, w che precedono direttamente la vocale accentuata
j, y, 3, w che seguono direttamente la vocale accentuata
– gruppo di semiconsonanti (j, y, 3, w) che seguono direttamente la vocale accentuata
j, y, 3, w in posizione pretonica
j, y, 3, w in posizione post-tonica
– Valore consonantico di 3
2- La semiconsonante ˁ
2.a- Pronuncia e mutamenti fonetici
2.b- Mutamenti vocalici causati dalla semiconsonante ˁ

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EGYPTIAN RELIGIOUS CALENDAR – Great Year of Ra CDXV-CDXVI (2015CE)

It is with great pleasure that we present you the new edition of the Egyptian Religious Calendar for the year 2015,
“EGYPTIAN RELIGIOUS CALENDAR –
Great Year of Ra CDXV-CDXVI (2015 CE)”
,
the Complete Egyptian Religious Calendar for the year 2015 with all the religious prescriptions and the sacred festivities for every single day of the year.
The book is available on amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/Egyptian-Religious-Calendar-CDXV-CDXVI-Great/dp/150528290X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1419256765&sr=1-1

egyptianreligiouscalendar2015

“EGYPTIAN RELIGIOUS CALENDAR – Great Year of Ra CDXV-CDXVI (2015 CE)” –
description (448 pages):
The Complete Egyptian Religious Calendar for the year 2015: the most comprehensive publication of the lists of the festivities of the Egyptian Religious Tradition (dated for the year 2015). A practical application of the Egyptian Religious Calendar for the current age.

The sources used to reconstruct the Religious Calendar and for the dating of the Sacred Festivities are:
– the “Cairo Calendar n. 86637” and the “Sallier papyrus IV”;
– the list of the religious celebrations dated to the Middle Kingdom;
and the lists of the Sacred Festivals from the Temples’ Religious Calendars:
– the religious calendar of King Thutmosis III from Ipet-Sut (the Precinct of Amon-Ra at Uaset-Thebes, “Karnak”);
– the Temple of King Thutmosis III at Elephantine;
– the Temple of King Ramses II at Abydos;
– the Temple of Millions of Years of King Ramses III, West Uaset (“Medinet Habu”);
– the Temple of Horus at Behdet (“Edfu”)
– the Temple of Hathor at Nitentòre (Dendera);
– the Double Temple of Haroeris and Sobek at Ombos (“Kom Ombo”);
– the Temple of Neith and Khnum at Iunyt (“Esna”).

INDEX:
-Introduction:
the Calendars of Ancient Egypt
the Civil Calendar
the Great Year of Ra
the Religious Calendar: the Seasons, the Months, the Days of the Month, Favorable and Adverse Days
-Egyptian Religious Calendar, List of the Festivities for the year 2015, CDXV-CDXVI Great Year of Ra

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Book Review of “SOBEK OF SHEDET-The Crocodile God in the Fayyum in the Dynastic Period” by Marco Zecchi

 

“Sobek of Shedet. The crocodile god in the Fayyum in the Dynastic Period”, by Marco Zecchi, 2010
ISBN # 978-88-6244-115-5 © 2010 Tau Editrice Via Umbria 148/7- 06059 Todi (PG) info@editrice.com

Book review written by Peter D Avellone

I originally procured this high-quality book on loan from the United States Library of Congress until I could afford the $100.00/80.00 Euro price tag available at Amazon.com. I have long been fascinated by the Egyptian Crocodile God Sobek, the premier crocodile deity of the Ancient Egyptian pantheon of Gods. As any else who has shown interest in Sobek, I found it very frustrating and difficult to find any substantial amount of information on Him in any one place. There are numerous fragments and accounts scattered across spells, texts, hymns, and internet sites, the latter of which are quite dubious in nature, or at best incomplete.
First and foremost, this is a research book for students and Egyptologists researching Ancient Egypt, and not an entertainment. Marco went to a lot of work compiling a fantastic wealth of what data is currently available on Sobek, from His pre-historic origins in the Fayyum, most notably in the ancient town of Shedet, His cult-center through to the ‘end’ of His divine career. He provides both his own and historical insights on Sobek, in several aspects; his syncretizations with Horus and later, Ra, and the importance those associations held in expanding His popularity beyond the agricultural powerhouse of the Fayyum region.
Marco also puts forth his reasoning in challenging many previously-arrived at conclusions and assumptions regarding Sobek and His accompanying history, and while drawing his own conclusions, maintains a professional demeanor, never coming across as haughty or derisive, and giving ample credence to the existence of archeological phenomena; i.e., the destruction, recycling, or movement of monuments, misplaced, or as-of-yet undiscovered artifacts. Marco places Sobek into context as an unapologetically masculine, ferociously virile deity ‘sweet of love’ and dangerous to women, hesitant to fully anthropomorphize away from his primal, reptilian core, yet eager to come forth as protector when invoked. Additionally, he delves into the psychological, fertility, and royal associations of this God and how His power base and influence expanded beyond the agricultural economic strength of the Fayyum Depression to become connected to Kingship by way of His role in rescuing Osiris.
This book documents the rise and fall of His divine fortunes through times of drought, invasion, and foreign rule. The root associations, functions, and meanings of His name, filial relationships, and the evolution of His epithets. Marco makes a point to note that Sobek exhibits some rather interesting base emotional and physiological mechanisms! I would like to have had more connections to His myths and stories, but I am not sure that these exist complete, or in any sense of entirety. To his credit, Marco is diligent throughout, including a massive bibliography and list of sources, which one can pursue at one’s own leisure. There is a lot of repetition, which some might find irritating, but I perceived more as ensuring clarity and proper identification of His roles in various towns and temples, since there were other ‘versions’ of Sobek, especially in later times, which Marcos, quite to my amusement, refers to as ‘shady’ or ‘imposters’. Among the rich list of epithets is Amenemhat III’s stirring hymn to Sobek the Shedtite. However, you will need to find a translator for this jewel, or translate from the demotic Egyptian yourself, and there are some terms still unknown in their meaning. Revealing the details of a dead civilization are not easy, and though archeological research into Ancient Egyptian civilization is an ever-expanding field, much has been lost to time, invasions, recycling of monuments, and the natural degradation or willful destruction of fragile documents. I found this work to be quite revealing and stimulating. Marco’s tone is enthusiastic, reverential and respectful throughout, to the point where I suspect that he too, has fallen under Sobek’s spell by the end of the book, as many of us who have come to know and love the Lord of Crocodiles.
I find myself returning to this work repeatedly to ‘connect the dots’ in my own personal research and for inspiration. I hope to see more on Sobek of Shedet in future works.

Thank you for providing this, Marco. Dua Sobek!

Marco Zecchi is a Lecturer in Egyptology at the Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna

Peter D Avellone is a Kemetic Reconstructionist fascinated by anything involving Sobek, my patron deity, and I welcome any information anyone has related to Him.

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Amnte Nofre – Newsletter n. 6

the sixth issue of our newsletter,
Amnte Nofre-Akhet season (25 August-21 December 2014)

(click on the cover to open the link)

 

Also available at these websites:

https://www.academia.edu/8195611/Amnte_Nofre_-_Newsletter_6

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“Egyptian Language: phonetic system and pronunciation” – part I

We are very glad to present you the first part of our study
“Egyptian Language: phonetic system and pronunciation”
dedicated to the study and reconstruction of the phonetic system and the pronunciation of the Ancient Egyptian language.

(click on the image to open the link)

 

Also available on the web-site academia.edu:

https://www.academia.edu/8123139/Egyptian_Language_phonetic_system_and_pronunciation_-_part_I

 

 The conventional pronunciation, as it is written at the beginning of every grammar of hieroglyphs, is simply a conventional reading invented by the scholars (the “e” between the consonants and the reading of the glides, like the “3” and the “w”, as fixed vowels, as it is for example for “Netjer/Netjeru” and for the names of the Gods such as ‘Heru’, ‘Aset’, ‘Djehuty’ and so on), and it does not reflect the real pronunciation of the Egyptian language: only thanks to the Coptic and to the transliteration of Egyptian words in other languages it is possible to know and reconstruct the real pronunciation of the Egyptian language, and this is exactly our line of research.

To give you some examples,
Nṯr , “God”, is pronounced “Noute” (in Upper Egypt)/ “Nouti” (in Lower Egypt)
Nṯr.t , “Goddess”, is pronounced “Entóre” (in Upper Egypt)/ “Enthóri” (in Lower Egypt)
Nṯr.w , “Gods”, is pronunced “Entèr” (in Upper Egypt)/”Enthèr” (in Lower Egypt)
Ḥr(w) , “Horus”, is pronounced “Hór”
Km.t , “Egypt” (literally the “Black Land”), is pronounced “Kéme” (in Upper Egypt)/”Chémi” (in Lower Egypt)

 

– Contents –

Introduction

Introduction to the Egyptian: stages of the language, the writing systems, and the Coptic

The Coptic alphabet and the pronunciation of the letters

The pronunciation of consonants

 

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Amnte Nofre – Newsletter n.5

the fifth issue of our monthly newsletter,
with an appendix dedicated to the Temple of Horus at Behdet: images and full description of the southern face of the Pylon
(click on the cover to open the link)

Also available at these websites:

https://www.academia.edu/7482161/Amnte_Nofre_-_Newsletter_5

http://www.scribd.com/doc/231634926/AMNTE-NOFRE-Newsletter5

 

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